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Archive for the 'Technology' Category

September 1, 2009

What a tease …

The all-new 2010 YZ450F isn’t to be launched until September 8, but you may find some clues about the new bike by watching the video below …
DanBro

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Posted @ 3:02 pm in Authors,Commuting,Dirt,Racing,Technology   
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August 13, 2009

First Impression: 2010 YZ250F (Video)

beats-cool
Kyle Beaton looks cool in front of the 2010 YZ250F.
How do you discover a bike’s true potential? Let a top pro ride it – and ride it hard. And that’s exactly what we did with the all-new 2010 YZ250F a few weeks back with Team Toyota Yamaha/Red Bull/Blackfoot/Fox Racing’s Kyle Beaton….

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Posted @ 12:29 pm in Authors,Commuting,Dirt,Racing,Technology   
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July 20, 2009

What could it be?

In less than 24 hours, Yamaha will unveil a shiny new, 2010 …. Haha, sorry, we can’t tell you anything else. You’ll just have to check back here when the time is right and you’ll find out!

DanBro

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Posted @ 12:30 pm in Commuting,Dirt,Racing,Technology   
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June 10, 2009

Get Your Fil: I Need More!

A Column by Yamaha Motor Canada’s Bryan Fil

Well, after my successful first race weekend I was officially hooked. I was very happy with my performance. The only thing that frustrated me was the horsepower difference from my current bike to the newer bikes of the other front runners. When we hit the back straights, I was being left behind, and it took everything I had to push harder and carry more speed than the others into every corner to regain back that difference, only to lose it all over again down the back straight and have to repeat everything all over again. The decision was made to get a newer bike and upgrade–I needed more HP….

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Posted @ 3:42 pm in Commuting,Racing,Sport,Technology   
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May 14, 2009

Care To Do Lunch?

Holy CR%P!!!
I just got back from my lunch break. Didn’t eat just went for a ride with one of my colleagues here at YMCA’s he2009_yzf-r1_bra_06ad office. Aaron had some errands to run and I had not had the chance to take out the all new 2009 Yamaha R1.
I had just finished hearing Dave MacDougall rave about the phenomenal response the 25+ Sport Bike riders had after testing the R1 at his recent MC Power Tour at POWERSPORT JUNCTION In Guelph. Dave seemed pretty stoked about the feedback he was getting from the riders so I thought, “What the heck… I’ll take it for a spin” (Gotta ride before I can talk about it… right!!?)
Aaron had the new FZR6r and I had the … Yamaha R1

Let me say it again… HOLY CR%P. This bike is awesome, Crossplane crankshaft with uneven firing order, Selectable drive modes… (What!) Inverted front forks, Radial front disc brakes, Variable intake, and new compact Deltabox chassis with fully adjustable suspension. I try to keep abreast of the latest technology but, put all this technology in one package… sick!

2009_yzf-r1_fea_09I fired it up… the sound was unlike anything I have ever heard, let alone ridden. Is it a twin? A triple? Doesn’t sound like an inline 4? I moved off casually, not knowing what to expect… a mid range surge… a top end rush…It delivered controllable power to the ground anywhere in the power band… NO, forget power band, there is no power band! Just start the beast and you’re in the power band. 20kph, 60kph, 100kph and above. Anywhere u twist the throttle it produces gobs of earth shattering torque and horsepower… I need to go change my pants…

Ok I just bought some stock in a dry cleaning business. I figured the cleaning business is going to boom if they are located next to a Yamaha dealership!
The R1’s power plant is so unbelievably good the guys and gals that purchase this bike are going to need to have their leathers laundered professionally EVERY single time they take their bike out for a ride.
Why aren’t our governments talking about this as a stimulus for the economy? ‘…No ticky / no laundry’

… No need to spend trillions of dollars bailing out the cage drivers, Put one of these in every driveway and we’ll have the sport population working over time to afford to buy more accessories, (and new riding gear). They’ll sell their cars and put snow tires on their new R1… they won’t want to give it up, it’s that good.

They’ll spend billions flying their bikes to far away places to find more roads, Infrastructure? They’ll lobby their politicians to build new twisty roads to the nearest 7 11 corner store… Take the long way home…

I have to stop. I need a dictionary. Think I’ll just use metaphors and similes to finish this blog:
More power than a locomotive, more reliable than my best friend. Cornering? Felt like it was on rails!! More of a rush than my 1st date kiss with a gal from Florida. Put a silly grin on my face bigger than that of the Cheshire Cat. The adrenaline rushing through my veins… feeling the ‘Fight or Flight’ syndrome… guess which option I chose.

I couldn’t finish the ride! I got off at an intersection and told Aaron he had to take her home. I’ve been riding long enough to know when I’ve had enough. It takes a bigger man than me to ride this bike on the street. While I’m riding it I’m invincible, I can do no wrong, it is confidence inspiring it makes up for all my short comings as a man, but then at the stop light, I couldn’t keep my hands and legs from shaking. “Aaron u take it”. The beast just purred and idled its unique 90deg uneven firing purr (sounded like it was laughing at me)

Can’t wait for the next track day. I’m a changed man… I have always considered my self to be educated and able to convey my thoughts and emotions easily through the spoken word… but this new R1 is beyond description. You’ll have to ride one for yourself and explain the silly grin that follows.

Did I say I can’t wait for my next track day???

Cheers Dre

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Posted @ 3:32 pm in Sport,Technology   
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January 24, 2008

Birth of the XV 1900 Custom “Raider” – Part 2

From early ‘protos’ to clay models to road tests in America

By John Bayliss

This is the continuing story of “How the XV 1900 was born.”

XV1900 Custom BikeBehind the scenes, extensive costing and engineering studies for the newly developed XV1900 custom bike are completed. If all goes well the project will get the green light and a development code will be issued. In the case of the new XV1900 the code was “06S” and during any and all discussions, the code name will be used until the model is released to the public.

While final detail work is under way, the engineering group will cobble together a running prototype. I used the word “cobbled” because some of the early “protos” look pretty rough. (You need to remember, the protos are for testing purposes… not styling.)

Testers from both Yamaha Japan and Yamaha USA will ride the prototype and provide feedback; everything from functionality to sound to ride comfort will be assessed.

clay1.jpgfianl-clay.jpgMeanwhile, back in Japan, clay models are painstaking carved and sanded in a special studio right at the factory. (See examples of clay models here, left and right.) The clay model will be the final styling phase before measurements are taken for moulds and dies, etc.

I have been present when some minor changes are requested and believe it or not, the “artists” can manipulate the clay model right before your eyes!

After the initial stages of testing are completed, another testing “prototype” will be produced, although in a farproto2.jpg more finished state. (See right, and below.) The test unit will be shipped to the US and tested on American roads. (Yep, right out in the public view! But from my own experience most passerbys never seem to notice.)

Every aspect of the test machine is evaluated, including suspension settings geared toward North American roads. Any issues or concerns will be reported back to Yamaha Motor Canada for improvement. Testing takes proto-final.jpg place right up until the first pre-production machines start to roll off the line.

So, if you think that Star cruisers are conceived, designed and built in Japan, think again!

Our friends south of the border can and should take most of the credit for the new XV1900 Custom (“aka) “Raider”.

Let me know if you like hearing the ‘behind the scenes’ development stuff. If you do, I’ll try to dig up some stories of previous models as well as the new ones. JB

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Posted @ 8:45 am in Cruisers,Custom,Industry Insights,Technology,Yamaha Insights   
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January 22, 2008

How the XV 1900 was born

Made in Japan? Not so fast…!

By John Bayliss

On Sept. 10, Yamaha introduced a number of exciting new models for 2008. I would like to take you behind the scenes and provide some insights into how our latest Star cruiser, the XV1900 Custom bike evolved; you might be surprised…

Made in Japan right? Not so fast! Made in Japan yes, but conceived and designed in the USA. Here is how the process works.2008 XV1900 Custom C bike from Yamaha

Yamaha Motor USA (YMUS) has a full staff of product planners who attend key motorcycle events across the country. They talk one-on-one with as many customers as possible.

As they begin to develop a feel and direction for a new model, they contact Yamaha USA’s design company in Southern California, near where YMUS is based.

The design company takes the research info and produces a number of basic sketches of the new idea. The sketches are shown both internally at YMUS and to selected customers. A “whittling down” process will reduce the number of sketches from 15 or so down to the top 3 or 4.

Depending on the model, the planners will then host a focus group study for even more feedback. At this stage YMUS maysketch2.jpg stick to the final design ideas or continue to make changes based on feedback.

sketch-1.jpgAfter much internal discussion, a final sketch direction is chosen. (See left and right here for sample bike sketches.)

The sketch is taken from paper and is duplicated in real life – yes, sir, a full-size prototype model with all the bells and whistles is produced. For the record, these models do not run but can be touched and sat on (very carefully please!) … they are real motorcycles for all intents and purposes – except for the riding part.cad1.jpg

As the old saying goes; “a picture (or in this case a 3D model, see left) is worth a thousand words!”

Once the model is finished (which happens surprisingly quickly), the model is crated and shipped off to Yamaha Japan (YMC).model2.jpg

The YMUS product planners, including their in-house Japanese assistant, travel to YMC for the big presentation. Engineers, upper management and sales staff are all present at this meeting. Can you say “pressure”? Believe me, this is a stressful time for all involved!

During the meeting, the planners review their customer research, current trends in the biz, and describe their ‘target audience’. The bottom line is they make their best pitch for this new idea. Once they have everybody truly excited about the project, they unveil the 3D model. If all goes well, the engineers jump up and start checking out the model in detail!

model1.jpgAfter a period of time, the engineers will begin to assess what they can, and cannot, do. Some of the features of the 3D model may not be possible to duplicate due to mass production restrictions. It is not uncommon for other players/countries to join these presentations, too. Yamaha Europe,Yamaha Australia, and Yamaha Canada are often present, with the hope that we’ll buy into the project.

Stay tuned for part 2 to come in the next few days!

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Posted @ 8:45 am in Cruisers,Custom,Industry Insights,Technology,Yamaha Insights   
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November 6, 2007

Welcome from John Bayliss

John BaylissHi, my name is John Bayliss, but you can call me JB. I’m the product manager for motorcycles and scooters at Yamaha Motor Canada Ltd. Welcome to the Yamaha Bike Blog!

One thing I would like to clear up right off the bat, is although I have been involved in the bike biz for many years (at Yamaha for 20 of them), I do not profess to know everything about motorcycles.

Unlike my snowmobile counterpart at Yamaha, Chris Reid, who blogs at Sled Talk, I don’t have an in-depth knowledge of all the technical aspects of our bikes and scooters. However, between me and my work colleagues also blogging here about bikes, we petty much do know everything about bikes – and what we don’t know, we want to hear from you about!

I am an avid on road and off road rider, plus I also dabble in track days. Most weekends (when I am not working), I usually spend at least a few hours riding or wrenching, especially restoring some vintage bikes of my own.

I own 10 motorcycles, ranging from street and dirt to a R6 track day bike. My fav ride right now is an ’07 Yamaha FZ1.

In the off-season, I can be found snowmobiling, skiing, and playing on the Yamaha hockey team.

I’m looking forward to sharing stories here that people can’t find anywhere else – such as behind-the-scenes peeks at Yamaha product development, long before the bikes hit the market. Hope you enjoy the insights!

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Posted @ 8:45 am in Authors,Dirt,Racing,Sport,Technology,trailer hitch,Yamaha Insights   
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November 1, 2007

Welcome to the Yamaha Canada Bike Blog

cr-0207.jpgHi, my name is Chris Reid and I am the Senior Product and Research Manager here at Yamaha Motor Canada. If you are also a ‘sled head’, you might know me as CR over on our sister blog, Sled Talk.

We have assembled a group of Yamaha Motor Canada employees who all love to ride and have some stories to tell. We hope you’ll check in often, and read what we have to say.

(As far as I know, Yamaha is the only motorsports company in Canada to host a blog where we interact with our friends and customers.)

If you have any questions or feedback for us, you’re welcome to add a comment and we’ll try to respond to as many as we can. There are some areas that we won’t be discussing (please see our Terms of Use) but for the most part, be nice and anything motorcycle-related goes!

If you like what you see, you can subscribe (enter email address on the right) and we’ll email you whenever we add a new post, or you can add Bike Blog to your list of RSS feeds. We’ll be populating the blog with a wide selection of content over the next few weeks and we’d love to hear what you have to say about it all.

I sincerely hope you enjoy Bike Blog and if you do, please let your friends know about us.

Cheers cr

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Posted @ 8:45 am in Commuting,Cruisers,Custom,Dirt,Industry Insights,Ladies Only,Maintenance,Racing,Scooters,Special Events,Sport,Technology,Travel Stories,Uncategorized,Yamaha Insights   
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